Categorized | Humboldt State, Politics

Campus Moves To Form University Senate

Student representation to be reduced to two non-directly elected senators

 

By Paul Mann
HSU Now

 

With the beginning of the spring semester, a new University Senate will replace the Academic Senate as the university’s main policy recommending body.

In a notable change, voting rights will be extended to all members of the University Senate, including two student senators chosen by Associated Students, with the exception of the University President, California Faculty Association president and the Union Council delegate. “The new senate will be a smaller body, but it will have broader representation from campus,” said Provost Robert Snyder. The new senate will be made up of 11 faculty senators, two students, three lecturers and three non–Management Personnel Plan staff members.

The senate’s primary duty is formulating educational policy, including admissions, curricula and criteria for granting degrees. The senate is also involved with the selection of administrative personnel and in the selection of future university presidents. Other duties include maintaining communication to campus delegates and establishing senate committees.

In an effort to encourage more participation in the senate, members’ terms are limited to three years and a senator may not serve more than two consecutive terms. Approximately one third of the membership will be elected annually to ensure a mix of new and experienced senators.

The formation of the university senate comes from a recommendation in the Cabinet for Institutional Change’s 2010 report, Building the Capacity for Change: Improving the Structure and Culture of Decision-making at HSU.

“We hope the University Senate will lead to a better sense of communal decision making with all stake holders involved,” said Jay Verlinden, chair of the Department of Communication and current president of the Academic Senate.

In April, the Academic Senate Executive Committee charged the Faculty Affairs Committee (FAC) to develop a written proposal for a University Senate structure. Using the university senate model from San Diego State as well as reviewing the current HSU General Faculty Constitution and Senate Bylaws, the FAC drafted new portions of the Constitution and Bylaws, which were approved by the General Faculty in September.

In addition to broader campus representation, the new senate is designed with a streamlined decision making processes. Senators will be required to serve on at least one senate committee, a policy aimed at involving senators at the beginning stages of policy development.

The new University Senate has its first meeting in January. For more information on the Academic Senate visit humboldt.edu/senate

For more information on the Cabinet for Institutional Change, visit change.humboldt.edu/change.

11 Responses to “Campus Moves To Form University Senate”

  1. A Little Sunshine says:

    “Approximately one third of the membership will be elected annually to ensure a mix of new and experienced senators”. Paul Mann.

    This is a perplexing dichotomy when considering that experience comes from having…..experience.

    This is what you must expect from HSU’s PR-hack, who understandably omits the single most important weakness of this “new” Senate: it retains its self-appointing structure which invites like-minded applicants to join together in resisting change.

    This author’s professional PR position at HSU should be identified and included with any of his publications.

    Shame!

  2. The source, namely Humboldt State’s official news service HSU Now, is cited at the top of the article, with a link included.

    • A Little Sunshine says:

      Reprinted articles usually include the professional identity of the author, not references elsewhere!

      Mr. Mann has his stink on many of the HSU Now articles, with the only reference to him appearing with the other writers as a general “contributor” to the magazine, not his professional career as HSU’s well-compensated PR man/journalist.

      After all, why include information that could taint the magazine, and its article’s credibility?

      • I know I don’t share his politics, but if Mann’s credibility is in serious question, it’s the first I’ve heard of it. I rather enjoyed his talk show on KHSU while it lasted — certainly a cut above in terms of openness and fair treatment of callers as opposed to how the regular host of Thursday Night Talk behaves…

  3. A Little Sunshine says:

    Obviously, if Mr. Mann’s professional career in public relations for HSU added to his credibility as a journalist at HSU, his articles in HSU Now would include his name and professional title each and every time.

    Just like credible media always does.

    However, When readers (like me) notice the plethora of his submissions lacking his personal info, the credibility of a PR/journalist demands questioning.

    Glad you liked his radio show. Surely he identified who is to listeners in each show….

    Right?

    • We used to run writer bios at the end of all the articles, and dropped this practice for the sake of brevity — it’s something we could start doing again if more folks ask for it.

      • A Little Sunshine says:

        Fascinating…

        …a reporter dodging disclosure for “brevity”…

        How many more must demand disclosure before you type the words, “public relations executive, HSU”, like other media?

        How many more omissions, like the one I exposed for you (above), must Mr. Mann gloss-over before you disclose?

        Truly unbelievable Mr. Douglas.

        • Anonymous says:

          IF there’s a link back to Paul’s HSU official website then we know where the story is from. Don’t see any dodging here.

          • A Little Sunshine says:

            No other credible media source I’ve ever read omits the simple and free responsibility of merely disclosing the profession or title of an author, ESPECIALLY, if that profession directly, or indirectly, connects the author to his story!

            Journalism 101.

            Let the reader’s decide credibility, not a gatekeeper.

            If you’re going to link to the story without publishing it, that’s a different matter altogether.

            The “dodge” is the litany of excuses for failing to disclose this author’s profession when publishing his articles, an integral part of journalism that, “the Sentinel used to do”, according to Mr. Douglas.

        • Paul Mann runs HSU Now. HSU Now is run by the University as is plain to see. We plainly link to HSU Now, and identify HSU Now as the source, right under Paul Mann’s name in every article of his we’ve ever run. There is no omission — it’s just not the kind of more lengthy bio that you would seem to prefer.

  4. A Little Sunshine says:

    And yet, another dodge Charles?

    Paul Mann’s title is so “lengthy” that it can legitimately be referred to in another internet site!!??

    Are you for real??

    Even HSU’s own “Humboldt” (“The Magazine of Humboldt State University”) refers to Paul Mann as a mere contributing “writer”, yet, none of its “magazine reports” that he authored lists him as the author…his PR writing style is a dead giveaway.

    You’ve just posted days of lengthy explanations and excuses for not including an authors simple title:

    “HSU PR director”!!!!!

    A fundamental lesson taught in high school journalism.

    After a week of dodging, will your ego fuel your continued resistance to routine journalistic disclosures?

    Truly unbelievable.

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