Categorized | Environment, Features, Media

The Man Who Planted Trees

 

Single-Handedly Planting a 1,360 Acre Forest

 

Skippy Massey
Humboldt Sentinel

 

Deforestation and desertification are critical problems in India that have led to barren land, increased soil erosion, decreased agricultural production, and devastated
local wildlife.  

However one Indian man has made a stand – by single-handedly
planting and cultivating a 1,360 acre forest that is home to a complex,
thriving ecosystem.

Jadav “Molai” Payeng started his project 30 years ago when he was still a teenager.  Then, in 1979, flood waters washed a large number of snakes ashore on the local sandbar in Jorhat, some 350 km from Guwahati.  When the waters receded, Payneg– who was 16 at the time– noticed the reptiles had died due to a lack of forestry.

“The snakes died in the heat, without any tree cover.  I sat down and wept over their lifeless forms.  It was carnage.  I alerted the forest department and asked them if they could grow trees there.  They said nothing would grow there. Instead, they asked me to try growing bamboo.  It was painful, but I did it. There was nobody to help me.  Nobody was
interested,” said Payeng, who is now 47.

Payeng chose to live on the sandbar, starting a life of isolation as he began work to create a new forest.  Planting the seeds by hand, watering the plants in the morning and evening, and pruning them when required, he cultivated a huge natural reserve.

After a few years, the sandbar was transformed into a bamboo thicket.

“I then decided to grow proper trees.  I collected and planted them.  I also transported red ants from my village, and was stung many times.  Red ants change the soil’s properties. That was an experience,” Payeng recalled.

Over the years, the reserve has seen a huge variety of flora and fauna blossom on the sandbar, including endangered animals like the one-horned rhino and Royal Bengal tiger.

“After 12 years, we’ve seen vultures.  Migratory birds, too, have started flocking here.  Deer and cattle have attracted predators,” claims Payeng. 

Unfortunately, locals reportedly killed a rhino which was seen in his forest, something that Payeng clearly disapproves of.  

”Nature has made a food chain; why can’t we stick to it?  Who
would protect these animals if we, as superior beings, start
hunting them?” Payeng said.

Amazingly, the Assam state forest department only learned about Payeng’s forest  in 2008 when a herd of some 100 wild elephants strayed into it after marauding through villages nearby.  It was then that assistant conservator of forests Gunin Saikia met Payeng for the first time.

“We were surprised to find such a dense forest on the sandbar.  Locals, whose homes had been destroyed by the pachyderms, wanted to cut down the forest, but Payeng dared them to kill him instead.  
He treats the trees and animals like his own children.  
Seeing this, we, too, decided to pitch in,” says Saikia.

“We’re amazed at Payeng. He has been at it for 30 years.  Had he been in any other country, he would have been made a hero.”

(Via The Times of India)

 

 

Decades later, the lush ecosystem he created is now a safe haven for a variety of large and small species that include birds, deer, rhinos, tigers and elephants impacted by extensive habitat loss.

Payeng makes a living in the forest he planted, rearing cows and selling milk in the nearest town with his wife and three children.

The extraordinary, yet humble, eco-conscious farmer stands as a shining example of what one person can accomplish to make the world a better place.  Now he is planning on devoting his next 30 years to planting another forest.

He says, “I feel sad when I see people felling trees.  We have to save the nature, or else we all will perish.”

* * * * * * * * * *

Our appreciation goes to Onahunttoday who sent this article along to us, and author Timon Singh of Inhabitat.com.

We feel everyone can and should make a difference in the world, making it a better place for future generations.  We like stories of those bringing about positive change, leading by example with ethical values and a strong moral will, and who often are the inspiring underdog bringing better things about for all through their sheer determination.

You can do it too.  In your own way, in your own community, with your own ideas and imagination.  Be inspired.  Plant a seed.  Grow a tree.  Like Payeng walking in his forest below, you, too, can make the magic happen.

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One Response to “The Man Who Planted Trees”

  1. Sika says:

    I always like to hear about planting trees all over the world. It helps us and nature in so many ways.

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