Categorized | Energy, Environment

The World of Free Energy

 

 

Tesla’s Invention Rebirthed?

**VIDEO**

 

Skippy Massey
Humboldt Sentinel

 

One of the greatest visionaries of the early 20th century
was genius electrical inventor Nikola Tesla.

His work to help develop the AC power system we all use to this day was crucial, but his personal goal was to develop a way to wirelessly transmit electrical power. 

Tesla got as far as building a huge tower for transatlantic wireless power demonstrations, but the system was never completed.

Now a group of Russian engineers want to complete Tesla’s work, and have launched a funding campaign to build a working prototype of Tesla’s wireless power system.

Leonid and Sergey Plekhanov are both graduates of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and they’ve spent years studying Tesla’s original work and patents, while conducting proof of concept experiments.  They are now convinced that Tesla was onto something, and that his unfinished project to complete a long distance wireless power transfer can really work.

The first job is to build a modern version of Tesla’s 187-ft tall Wardencliffe transmission tower, and they’re seeking funds on Indiegogo to get the effort going.

Currently, they’re off to a pretty slow start towards their $800,000 goal with over a month left.  

The Plekhanov’s say that just 39,000 square miles of solar panels could provide enough electricity to meet the entire global electrical demand.  

That may seem like a tall order, but consider it’s actually a square solar panel farm of only 200 miles on each side to power the entire world.  The problem is getting that power from the sunny places where it can be generated to the rest of the world where it is needed.

The Russian team feels that the Tesla transmission system could provide the answer.  And, as Tesla envisioned, it would be instant, wireless, worldwide, cheap and abundant.

To note, Nikola Tesla, at the press conference honoring his 77th birthday in 1933, said electrical power is present everywhere in unlimited quantities “and could drive the world’s machinery without the need of coal, oil, gas, or any other fuels”.

A reporter asked him if the sudden introduction of his system would upset the present economic system.

Tesla replied, “It is badly upset already.”

Tesla dreamed of a world free from poverty, hunger, famine and drought.  He also dreamed of making practical and unlimited power available, believing that energy and electricity were the keys to improving the quality of life for the billions of people on the planet.

Understanding that energy and electricity exist freely in nature, he invented a wireless magnifying transmitter using the earth’s geomagnetic pulse to supply wireless electricity to homes and businesses. 

He died before seeing his invention come to fruition.

Check out the video above to get a preview of the project,
stay tuned, and don’t change that dial, Sparky.

~Via Google, Activist Post, Impact Lab, YouTube

 

 

 

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2 Responses to “The World of Free Energy”

  1. tiso says:

    Le nom Wardenclyffe porte en lui une partie de la clef qui ouvre sur l’énergie libre, suivez l’Hudson river.

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  1. [...] Nikola Tesla was born July 10, 1856, and died on January 7, 1943.  If you’re reading this now, you have him to thank. [...]


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