Tag Archive | "Hana Ryu"

The Brilliance of Youth

 

Inspiring Bright Lights

(VIDEO)

 

Skippy Massey
Humboldt Sentinel

 

 

“There is a fountain of youth: it is your mind, your talents, the creativity you bring to your life and the lives and of people you love.

When we learn to tap this source, we will truly have defeated age.”

~Sophia Loren

 

America’s Young Up and Coming Tenors

One of the acts that blew the other competition out of the water on America’s Got Talent a few days ago was the Forte Tenors, seen in the above clip.

The Forte Tenors trio is made up of three young guys:  Josh Page, Fernando Varela, and Hana Ryu.  Before their live performance on America’s Got Talent, they had never performed together in front of an audience in their lives.  In fact, they met each other in person only a few days prior to their debut.

Josh Page is 23 years old from New York and the founder of The Brothers Page, a group he founded with his brother Zach.  Fernando Varela is a proud Puerto Rican singer and father.  Hana Ryu is from South Korea but now lives New York after coming to the States four years ago.

Did they dazzle us?  You bet, and they caused the audience and the judges to explode with clapping and standing ovations after their surprising performance of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Pie Jesu.

 

Teen’s Pharmaceutical Company Highlights Innovation with “Flying Syringe”

Provita Pharmaceuticals isn’t your regular biotechnology company. For one thing, no one on its 15-member staff is over the age of 18.

More surprisingly, Joshua Meier is the CEO of Provita, even though he’s 16 years old.

While most 16-year-old boys are video gaming and seeking to snag dates, Meier’s company has given a presentation to the FDA and submitted its grant idea for the “flying syringe,” a tool using mosquitoes to deliver vaccines to those in need for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Provita was founded in 2008, before Meier had entered high school. He was part of a group of seven magnet high school programs focused on subjects from business to medicine.  His group, which was science-focused, collaborated with the business-focused students and created a business plan for Provita.

The Bergen County Technical Schools district funds Provita, giving the youthful company access to everything from a stem cell lab to a microbiology lab.  Its first project was Coagula, which aimed to reduce the amount of injections suffered by hemophilia and von Willebrand patients.

Now, it’s working on the flying syringe.  The idea is genetically engineering mosquitoes to produce and deliver a vaccine for the West Nile Virus, similar to plans with malaria.  Their project has caught the attention of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, which has expressed interest in helping with future development of the firm.

–And the company does it humbly for educational and humanitarian gain; there’s not a profit in sight.

 

Why Didn’t We Think of That?

What were you doing when you were 15?  Probably not revolutionizing the way we deal with blackouts and coal mines and other dark places.

When the power goes out we’ve all had to decide between candles and flashlights, yet both have the same drawback:  they eventually run out.

Ann Makosinski, a 15-year-old student with St. Michaels University School in Canada, has created a flashlight that is powered solely by the heat of a human hand.  For this, she has been chosen as one of 15 finalists for Google’s global science fair.

She created the device using the idea of Peltier tiles, which are devices that create energy when one side is heated while the other side is cooled.  Combining this which created enough power, to a store-bought circuit providing enough voltage, she ended up with The Hollow Flashlight.

Inside the flashlight is nothing but air, which acts as the cooling agent.  So, wrap your hand around the outside and you’ve got the necessary temperature duality.  It requires absolutely no outside power source other than a human hand.  And it only cost Ann $26.  If they ever begin mass producing these things– and they really should– Makosinski thinks her flashlight can be made far cheaper.

Makosinski briefly explains the process of building her flashlight here.

 

Helping Humboldt Through Lemonade, One Cup at a Time

From the Times-Standard article by Catherine Wong:

When Monica Bode’s daughters told her they wanted to hold a lemonade stand for Miranda’s Rescue this summer, she said, “OK, but it’s Monday.”

Six-year-old Samya Bode and 14-year-old Kelsea Bode replied, “We know, Mommy.  We want to do it every day.”

Bode said she and her daughters found out about Miranda’s Rescue after her sister adopted a dog from the no-kill animal sanctuary in Fortuna.  She said Samya wants to be a veterinarian when she grows up because she knows that a large portion of the shelter’s money goes to veterinary costs.

This summer, the Bode family will be serving 9 ounce cups of ice-cold lemonade from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. outside of their McKinleyville apartment complex on Fischer Road near Roger’s Market every day until the Annual Wine & Cheese Open House at Miranda’s Rescue on Aug. 4.

Kelsea said she has held lemonade stands before, but she has never done one over the course of multiple days or for a charity.  She said that even something as easy as a lemonade stand can be stressful in a rush.

”They have huge hearts, and I love them for wanting to do this,” Bode said…

You can read Catherine Wong’s full article here.

 

Ryan Wang, the Five-Year Old Carnegie Hall Pianist:

 

Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every night going to rest and sleep a little death.

~Arthur Schopenhauer

 

Please spread the word.  Share this– and all of our posts– with others, and friend us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.  We appreciate and thank you for reading, and for giving us a little push in the right direction.

 

Posted in Local, Media, NationalComments (0)


HumSentinel on Twitter

RSS Progressive Review

  • Jazz break
    Count Basie: One O'clock Jump […]
  • What's happening
    On the eve of the 5-year Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference, thousands of people from around the globe will gather in New York City April 24-26 to demand a nuclear-free, peaceful, just and sustainable world. […]
  • One more reason why TPP threatens America's sovreignty
    State laws and regulators are increasingly important as gridlock in Washington makes broad federal action on important issues an increasingly rare event. From environmental protection to civil rights to the minimum wage, the action is at the state level. Ironically, one thing that may get done soon in Washington is a trade agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partne […]
  • Gallery: Some of the world's best sky gardens
    […]
  • How Bill Clinton helped create the new Cold War
    Global Research […]
  • Fast food workers pul off strike in 236 cities
    Portside - In 236 cities in the U.S. and roughly 100 more around the world from Sao Paulo to New Zealand and from Glasgow to Tokyo, according to protest spokespeople, fast food and other low-wage workers joined together to pressure employers like McDonald’s to raise their workers’ pay.Organizers claimed that it was the largest protest by low-wage workers in […]
  • A Missouri town elects a black mayor - and then. . .
    Daily Koa- Born and raised in tiny Parma, Missouri, Tyrus Byrd, a Christian missionary and the city clerk of Parma, decided she wanted to give running for mayor a shot. She beat the incumbent mayor, a white man, by 37 votes. Before she could take office, police officers and city employees scrambled like roaches with the light flipped on:Tyrus Byrd will be sw […]
  • Jailing people for unpaid child supporrt
    NY Times  There is no national count of how many parents are incarcerated for failure to pay child support, and enforcement tactics vary from state to state, as do policies such as whether parents facing jail are given court-appointed lawyers. But in 2009, a survey in South Carolina found that one in eight inmates had been jailed for failure to pay child sup […]
  • Some states downgrading felonies to cut prison overuse
    Sentencing Project […]
  • Post Constitutional America: Security expert detained by FBI for tweeting about airport security
    Electronic Freedom Foundation -  Our client, Chris Roberts, a founder of the security intelligence firm One World Labs, found himself detained by the FBI earlier this week after tweeting about airplane network security during a United Airlines flight. When Roberts landed in Syracuse, he was questioned by the FBI, which ultimately seized a number of his elect […]
  • Pennyslvania's Orwellian classrooms
    Steve Singer, Bad Ass Teachers - In Pennsylvania, we force kids to abide by a specific code of conduct for test takers. They must enter a quasi-legal relationship before they are even permitted to begin the tests we’re forcing them to take. Much of this code is common sense. Get a good night’s sleep. Fill in bubbles completely using a number two pencil.But s […]
  • Department of Good Stuff: Economy
    Gar Alperovitz Dean Baker Dirt Diggers Digest Economic Policy Institute Center for New Economics Ctr for Economic & Policy Research Naked Capitalism Off the Charts Robert ReichSteady State Economy  Talk Poverty […]
  • New book raises questions about Clinton Foundation
    NY Times - “Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Governments and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich,” by Peter Schweizer — a 186-page investigation of donations made to the Clinton Foundation by foreign entities — is proving the most anticipated and feared book of a presidential cycle still in its infancy.The book, a copy of which […]
  • EPA tells kids to get out of bathtub
    Parents across America who struggle to keep their young rambunctious kids clean now have a new obstacle: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.As part of its effort to help save the planet from the dangers of taking too many baths, the EPA’s WaterSense program is trying to convince kids they should avoid bathtubs in favor of showers, which it says is a fa […]
  • Single donor PACs buying politicians
    Robert Faturechi and Jonathan Stray, ProPublica - A growing number of political committees known as super PACs have become instruments of single donors, according to a ProPublica analysis of federal records. During the 2014 election cycle, $113 million—16 percent of money raised by all super PACs—went to committees dominated by one donor. That was quadruple […]